A feeling is no longer the same when it comes the second time. It dies through the awareness of its return. We become tired and weary of our feelings when they come too often and last too long.

Pascal Mercier, Night Train to Lisbon (via feellng)

(via ifveniceissinking)

paintedout:

Mark Rothko

(via remnant)

My coach said I ran like a girl, I said if he could run a little faster he could too.

Mia Hamm (via womenorgnow)

(via withcharmtospare)

malformalady:

Heart of a 26-year-old man, perforated by a bullet, New York, 1937. New York City Medical Examiner’s Collection, National Museum of Health and Medicine, Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, Washington, D.C.

(via ifveniceissinking)

The desire to come off like you aren’t trying too hard extends to most areas of life typically thought of as the domain of women. Home décor: “Those vintage end tables? Oh, I picked them up at a flea market.” (Don’t mention that it took months to find the perfect sofa, and it was so expensive it practically required a second mortgage.) Workout routines: “I just do a little yoga and try to take the stairs.” (Don’t mention the personal trainer.) Relationships: “We just click, you know?” (Don’t mention the couples’ therapist.) Outwardly, everything is easy.

stunningpicture:

Just before a shark breaks the surface tension of the water

(via lecoupdevide)

(via saisonlune)

For INFJs, expressing themselves through their Fe(elings) is critical to their psychological and physical health and well-being. Even if doing so does not provide them with immediate solutions to the problem at hand, they tend to feel better once they have expressed their feelings, whether through words or tears. This is especially important for the mates or friends of INFJs to recognize. While not necessarily looking for others to solve their problems, INFJs value emotional support, empathy, and reassurance. Without such an outlet, INFJs can begin to feel isolated and depressed, turning to their inner fantasy world as a means of escape. And while fantasizing may seem helpful in the short-term, it can make the real world seem even less tolerable and exacerbate existing frustrations toward life.

 In a human hand there are 27 bones. Some apes have more. A gorilla has 32, five in each thumb. A human has 27. If you break an arm or a leg, the bone grows back together by calcification. It will be stronger than before. If you break a bone in your hand, it will never recover completely. Before every fight, you’ll think. In each slap, you’ll think. You’ll be careful. But at some point the pain will come back. Like needles. Like glass splinters.

(via nobodyshippie)

Capitalism not only denies the majority any real control over their lives, it also insists that this unfair arrangement be accepted as normal. To contain rebellion, all who are impoverished and oppressed are treated as personally inadequate, biologically defective, mentally ill – anything other than the victims of a heartless and exploitive system.

chabochi:

louisiana

(via pullmybauhaus)

I must say a word about fear. It is life’s only true opponent. Only fear can defeat life. It is a clever, treacherous adversary…It begins in your mind, always … so you must fight hard to express it. You must fight hard to shine the light of words upon it. Because if you don’t, if your fear becomes a wordless darkness that you avoid, perhaps even manage to forget, you open yourself to further attacks of fear because you never truly fought the opponent who defeated you.

Yann Martel, Life of Pi (via wordsnquotes)

(via fleursdansmescheveux)

free-parking:

Mark RothkoBlue and Grey, 1962, oil on canvas

I’m not an abstractionist… I’m not interested in relationships of color or forms… I’m interested only in expressing basic human emotions—tragedy, ecstasy, doom and so on… The people who weep before my pictures are having the same religious experience I had when I painted them.”—Mark Rothko, 1956

(via kgbees)

Lately, I’ve been thinking about who I want to love, and how I want to love, and why I want to love the way I want to love, and what I need to learn to love that way, and who I need to become to become the kind of love I want to be… and when I break it all down, when I whittle it into a single breath, it essentially comes out like this: Before I die, I want to be somebody’s favorite hiding place, the place they can put everything they know they need to survive, every secret, every solitude, every nervous prayer, and be absolutely certain I will keep it safe. I will keep it safe.

Andrea Gibson (via earnestly)

(via cobwebshuntmyattic)

(via theepitomeofquiet)