Telling a young girl she can’t wear what she wants because it’s not appropriate encourages the idea that men’s reactions should dictate society’s norms, and that all women are meta-Eves, tempting and ensnaring men with our sultry-eyed gaze. My parents’ culture is steeped in patriarchy, in the philosophy of the one-step machismo machine, where there is just one kind of man, and two kinds of women: the angel and the whore. These limited ideas of masculinity breed men who want ownership of women.

Fariha Roison (via girl-violence)

(via ifveniceissinking)

hermione:

I did not kill my wife. I am not a murderer.

Gone Girl (2014), dir. David Fincher

(via charliestokers)

Sandro Botticelli, PRIMAVERA (1482)

(via allwinksandsmiles)

dear friends, here is a brief psa

kittydesade:

westerosbaptistchurch:

things that do not make you a man:

  • genital configuration

things that do make you a man:

  • inability to slay the witch-king of angmar

(via gedankenspruenge)

c0ssette:

Fra Angelico,The Annunciation (details)

(via yawnyatheapocalypse)

These are the soul’s changes. I don’t believe in ageing. I believe in forever altering one’s aspect to the sun. Hence my optimism.

Virginia Woolf, from her diaries (via airwalker)

Places I’d sell my body for a visit: Greece +

(via ifveniceissinking)

The daily routine of most adults is so heavy and artificial that we are closed off to much of the world. We have to do this in order to get our work done. I think one purpose of art is to get us out of those routines. When we hear music or poetry or stories, the world opens up again.

Ursula LeGuin (via nathanielstuart)
Title: The Rains of Castamere Artist: Sigur Rós 244,222 plays

Sigur Rós cover The Rains of Castamere for Season 4 of HBO’s Game Of Thrones

And so he spoke, and so he spoke,
that Lord of Castamere,
But now the rains weep o’er his hall,
with no one there to hear.
Yes now the rains weep o’er his hall,
and not a soul to hear.

(via nobodyshippie)

Elizabeth I, The Phoenix Portrait (detail), Nicholas Hilliard, 1575

(via mashamorevna)

Just how accurate are the memories that we know are true, that we believe in?

The brain abhors a vacuum. Under the best of observation conditions, the absolute best, we only detect, encode and store in our brains bits and pieces of the entire experience in front of us. When it’s important for us to recall what it was that we experienced, we have an incomplete [memory] store, and what happens?

Below awareness, without any kind of motivated processing, the brain fills in information that was not there, not originally stored, from inference, from speculation, from sources of information that came to you, as the observer, after the observation. But it happens without awareness such that you aren’t even cognizant of it occurring. It’s called ‘reconstructed memory.’

All our memories are reconstructed memories. They are the product of what we originally experienced and everything that’s happened afterwards. They’re dynamic. They’re malleable. They’re volatile. And as a result, we all need to remember that the accuracy of our memories is not measured in how vivid they are nor how certain you are that they’re correct.

Are your memories real .. or fake? Neurophysiologist Scott Fraser says you shouldn’t be so sure that what you remember is always what actually happened. Fraser researches how humans remember crimes, and in a powerful talk at TEDxUSC, he suggests that even close-up eyewitnesses to a crime can create “memories” they couldn’t have seen.

Watch the whole talk here» (via we-are-star-stuff)

(via lore-light)

sagansense:

skunkbear:

First prize in Science’s Visualization Challenge (video category) went to this NASA video by Greg Shirah, Horace Mitchell, and Tom Bridgman. It shows Earth’s “climate engine” — the wind patterns and ocean currents that are powered by the sun.

For all who haven’t seen it, watch PBS NOVA’s ‘Earth From Space’ - a two hour feature revealing precisely how planet works, the processes that govern climate, the spacecraft which permit us this knowledge, and an understanding of our biosphere that will forever change the way you think of “home.”

(via saveusastraea)

(via nobodyshippie)

Much like the human version… depression in animals spans the full spectrum of severity, from brief and shallow periods of low mood to long and intense stretches of depression. Animals also experience the same hormonal changes that depressed humans do, including higher secretion of steroid hormones and dampened immune system function. Perhaps most interestingly and indicatively, the body clocks of depressed animals — their circadian rhythms, which we already know are of tremendous importance to human well-being — are so disrupted that they produce the same irregularities in body temperature and sleep-wake cycle seen in depressed humans.

Can pets be depressed? The science behind what every pet-owner intuits.  (via explore-blog)

romaea:

Siberian Architecture

(via cobwebshuntmyattic)