Places I’d sell my body for a visit: Greece +

(via ifveniceissinking)

The daily routine of most adults is so heavy and artificial that we are closed off to much of the world. We have to do this in order to get our work done. I think one purpose of art is to get us out of those routines. When we hear music or poetry or stories, the world opens up again.

Ursula LeGuin (via nathanielstuart)
Title: The Rains of Castamere Artist: Sigur Rós 226,600 plays

Sigur Rós cover The Rains of Castamere for Season 4 of HBO’s Game Of Thrones

And so he spoke, and so he spoke,
that Lord of Castamere,
But now the rains weep o’er his hall,
with no one there to hear.
Yes now the rains weep o’er his hall,
and not a soul to hear.

(via nobodyshippie)

Elizabeth I, The Phoenix Portrait (detail), Nicholas Hilliard, 1575

(via mashamorevna)

Just how accurate are the memories that we know are true, that we believe in?

The brain abhors a vacuum. Under the best of observation conditions, the absolute best, we only detect, encode and store in our brains bits and pieces of the entire experience in front of us. When it’s important for us to recall what it was that we experienced, we have an incomplete [memory] store, and what happens?

Below awareness, without any kind of motivated processing, the brain fills in information that was not there, not originally stored, from inference, from speculation, from sources of information that came to you, as the observer, after the observation. But it happens without awareness such that you aren’t even cognizant of it occurring. It’s called ‘reconstructed memory.’

All our memories are reconstructed memories. They are the product of what we originally experienced and everything that’s happened afterwards. They’re dynamic. They’re malleable. They’re volatile. And as a result, we all need to remember that the accuracy of our memories is not measured in how vivid they are nor how certain you are that they’re correct.

Are your memories real .. or fake? Neurophysiologist Scott Fraser says you shouldn’t be so sure that what you remember is always what actually happened. Fraser researches how humans remember crimes, and in a powerful talk at TEDxUSC, he suggests that even close-up eyewitnesses to a crime can create “memories” they couldn’t have seen.

Watch the whole talk here» (via we-are-star-stuff)

(via lore-light)

sagansense:

skunkbear:

First prize in Science’s Visualization Challenge (video category) went to this NASA video by Greg Shirah, Horace Mitchell, and Tom Bridgman. It shows Earth’s “climate engine” — the wind patterns and ocean currents that are powered by the sun.

For all who haven’t seen it, watch PBS NOVA’s ‘Earth From Space’ - a two hour feature revealing precisely how planet works, the processes that govern climate, the spacecraft which permit us this knowledge, and an understanding of our biosphere that will forever change the way you think of “home.”

(via saveusastraea)

(via nobodyshippie)

Much like the human version… depression in animals spans the full spectrum of severity, from brief and shallow periods of low mood to long and intense stretches of depression. Animals also experience the same hormonal changes that depressed humans do, including higher secretion of steroid hormones and dampened immune system function. Perhaps most interestingly and indicatively, the body clocks of depressed animals — their circadian rhythms, which we already know are of tremendous importance to human well-being — are so disrupted that they produce the same irregularities in body temperature and sleep-wake cycle seen in depressed humans.

Can pets be depressed? The science behind what every pet-owner intuits.  (via explore-blog)

romaea:

Siberian Architecture

(via cobwebshuntmyattic)

Have you ever seen anyone being blood-eagled before? I’m told it is the worst, most painful death of all… but astonishing. Truly astonishing to those who watch.

cunt-candle:

i cant tell if im really nice but secretly an asshole or an asshole but secretly really nice

(via treeleaves)

lore-light:

thekhooll:

Michael Anderson shoots icy seclusion of the Canadian Rockies.

(via lecoupdevide)

No one wants to be the person who is made fun of for caring too much about something, who treats in earnest a situation that everyone else considers absurd. Even in personal relationships, feeling too heavily invested while simultaneously understanding that the other person couldn’t be more detached is one of the most profound feelings of embarrassment we can experience. Because it isn’t simply the embarrassment of making a mistake or a poor choice, it’s a shame over the kind of human being you are and how you see the world around you. To be shamed for your sincerity is to be reminded that you are dependent on something which is not dependent on you — that you are, once again, vulnerable.

(via cohleharts)

The so called terrorism we are fighting, in reality, is the counterviolence created by the terrorism we commit. If we really wanted to end terrorism, we would stop participating in it.