brutereason:

The Woman Against Feminism Twitter is my favorite.

When you live in the dark for so long, you begin to love it. And it loves you back, and isn’t that the point? You think, the face turns to the shadows, and just as well. It accepts, it heals, it allows.

But it also devours.

Carver, Raymond. Late Fragment.  (via mirroir)

(via bastardette)

radicaldaydream-er:

have you ever had a dream of someone you haven’t seen or talked to in years and wonder if anyone ever randomly dreams about you too.

(via withcharmtospare)

littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Intricate and Beautiful Paper Cutting Art of Maude White

Maude White is a paper cutting artist living in Buffalo, NY. She loves the great strength, yet delicacy of paper. Her work is done on the macro as well as the micro level. Every cut is exact and meaningful. She enjoys playing with positive and negative space to create fantastic scenes and stories. She considers herself a craftsperson and has a deep respect for the paper she transforms. In pursuing her work, she hopes to make visible to others the immense world of possibilities that every piece of paper holds.

Maude White: Birds I’ve Been

September 5th-October 25th, 2014
Opening September 5th, 2014 6-9pm

White’s show is the fourth in the 12 x 14 series at WNYBAC, which features 5 artists over the course of twelve months; Maude will also host a free collaborative event that will give insight into her process on Saturday September 20th, 2014 from 12-5pm.

”When I cut paper, I feel as if I am peeling back the outer, superficial layer of our vision to reveal the secret space beneath. With paper cutting there are so many opportunities to create negative space that tells its own story. Letting the observer become present in the piece allows him or her to look through it. I like the idea of the stark contrast between the black and white paper, and the cut nature of the work makes my art more three-dimensional than paint on canvas. ”

(via twowrongturns)

When you commit to doing something, you make a promise to yourself. And when you break that promise out of laziness, discouragement, or fear, you are only cheating yourself. You are not “getting away with something.” You are only getting away from your own potential. When you commit to making your dream come true, that is the promise you simply decide to never, ever break. It doesn’t matter how many times you get discouraged, or exhausted, or frustrated, you just remember that you have not given yourself the option to quit. That is what commitment is — when the idea of ever stopping your efforts simply doesn’t exist. You have infinite patience and resilience because there is no other option. You have the ability to bear the pain and frustration because you must find a way to beat it. It doesn’t mean it won’t feel hard to press on — it might feel impossible, and yet you still find a way to keep going. You simply always press on. At a certain point, all your effort and energy and power is only directed towards your dream, and you no longer have to waste any energy on trying to motivate yourself to keep going.

yagodichjagodic:

Lily Cole in ‘Highland tale’ photographed by Olaf Wipperfurth.

(via bastardette)

There was
no night.

The night was in my head.

Louise Glück, Landscape (via whyallcaps)

(via saveusastraea)

thehistoryofsilence:

Drew’s mountain range is really comin’ along. I’m particularly proud of this piece so far. New needles, different inks, new machines, new techniques, all within the past two or three months. by bones! on Flickr.

(via bastardette)

(via generation-war)

You see, I take the parts that I remember and stitch them back together
to make a creature that will do what I say
or love me back.

Richard Siken, excerpt of Litany in Which Certain Things are Crossed Out (via camilla-macauley)

(via mashamorevna)

shollowsource:

Nicole Beharie: TCA Portrait Series

(via charliestokers)

[…] A mature, realistic peacemaker will be the first to tell you, once the cycle of violence has gotten to the point there’s suicide bombers looking to blow themselves up in your midst or psychopathic killers looking to chop off your head, the peace process needs to concentrate on self preservation. It’s important, here, not to escalate beyond self-preservation into a vengeful orgy.

What seems to me the most important point to make here is the need for serious, socially respected peace talks that work on a separate track from the war-making track. Yes, there is a problem with this, and that is people who live for vengeance don’t extend much respect to those who would talk peace with counterparts of the demonized enemy. And vengeance lovers tend to be the ones with the guns, the police and the prisons.

Since it’s above the fold in the news right now, I’ll use Israel/Palestine for an example. It seems to me the reason peace talks never work there is because they are totally reliant on a pre-existing climate of peace. This is as absurd as it is true. In other words, you have to have peace (a complete cessation of all violence) in order to begin talking about peace. The only workable solution is to have peace talks on a separate social track than war decisions. A useful checks and balance dynamic within the social contract. Peace talks would go on even as suicide bombers were blowing up buses and F16s were flattening apartment houses in the neighborhood.

The question is do the combatants really want peace — or do they actually want war? The answer too often seems to be no, they really don’t want peace. Mao Zedong’s conclusion that power grows out of the barrel of a gun seems to prevail in the United States and in the Middle East.

Anonymous asked: What advice do you have for a 14 year old girl?

porn4smartgirls:

This is so vague I love it. The voices you are hearing are real, god is speaking to you. The nation of France needs you. Don your armor, take up arms, lead the French army. This is your destiny, joan. When the flames come for you let them lick your bones and laugh.

The paradox of vengefulness is that it makes men dependent upon those who have harmed them, believing that their release from pain will come only when their tormentors suffer.

Laura Hillenbrand, Unbroken: A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption (via wordsnquotes)

(via keatspring)

(via keatspring)